ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop

ETUG_Spring_2015_Logo

On June 4th and 5th 2015, members of the Centre for Instructional Development attended the ETUG Spring Workshop at SFU.

ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop, SFU

Here are highlights and observations from the fun and informative presentations:


Day 1

Keynote Address: “Anatomy of 21st Century Educator”

Simon Bates, UBC

In his slide show, Simon described different aspects that make up a 21st Century educator:

  • Teacher for Learning: design effective instructional activities to support active learning
  • Research-based investigation
  • Technology in delivery/assessment
  • Curator (facilitator) of existing resources
  • Collaborator (work wi others; share)
  • Experimenter (how we incorporate new ideas/methods)

Another aspect Simon emphasized was student control in constructing content and context. In contrast to a Learning Management System (like Moodle), which  is an institutionally-controlled learning space, Students could use other online tools, such as PeerWise to collect and curate their own course content.

Peerwise is a course-based question repository, developed by students, that leverages student creativity and collaboration to develop course content. In effect, it is a student-moderated space, and is particularly effective for larger classes. Students can also tag content, creating their own keywords (or use teacher’s own taxonomy).


Basic iPad Training Session for VIU Forestry Students

Michael Paskevicius, Vancouver Island University

Michael’s presentation was a”broad overview of the iPad and basic device management for students entering a program which requires the iPad.”

Preferred Mobile Platform

From the perspective of the project and institution, it was easiest and most practical to support only one brand of mobile device, and the participants were encouraged to buy their own device.

For this project, iPads were selected as the preferred platform to:

  • Reduce textbook purchase costs for students: students will be offered free and/or openly licensed digital textbooks access through the device.
  • Mirror industry standard practices from the field: iPads are emerging as an industry-standard device for the collection of data in the field.
  • Enable collaborative learning in the classroom: allow students to use iPads for group work in class and to share to the projector via AppleTV.

Polling and Quizzing in the Field

Real-time online polling tools (such as Socrative and Polls.io) also played a big role in gathering student feedback and facilitating discussion. QuesTinSitu was used for its geolocationing ability, allowing questions to be asked that relied on knowledge of geography or a physical presence in a particular location.

Mobile let’s students access more text + documents, and easier to transport than many expensive texts.

Additional Resources:


Day 2

Marginalia Annotation Tool

Lannie Kanevsky, SFU
http://www.sfu.ca/education/faculty-profiles/lkanevsky.html

Marginalia is defined as “scribbles, comments and illuminations in the margins of a book.” This old human habit has been found in manuscripts dating back to the 4th Century AD.

Lannie Kanevsky’s Slideshow:
http://scope.bccampus.ca/pluginfile.php/52542/mod_resource/content/1/ETUG%20Marginalia%20Slides%20Kanevsky.pdf

Prior to putting 75% of one of her courses online, Lannie had her students respond to assigned readings in a printed “triple-entry journal” format in order to critically engage them with the texts prior to each class meeting.

Offline, a “Triple entry notebook” can engage students offline, before class so you don’t have to lecture. (Kooy + Kanevsky)

In a Triple-entry Notebook, Students write in margins, working in groups of 3-4, not talking, but interacting by writing in margins of a page of prepared writing.

Lannie resisted pressures to move this process online until she could find a way for students to interact with the assigned readings and each other with the same pedagogical richness and learning outcomes.

This finally became possible when she found Marginalia, a free, friendly, downloadable tool that can be embedded in Moodle discussion forums. It enables students to select portions of a text posted in a discussion forum on a Moodle (a learning management system) and annotate it with their comments appearing in the margin beside the text they’d selected.

As they had in printed responses, active conversations among classmates, the author of the posting and the instructor emerge as others comment on the comments that accumulate in the margins. Lannie demonstrated Marginalia, shared student guidelines for this process, and her students’ work, and encouraged participants to play with Marginalia on their laptops.

Marginalia integrates with the Moodle LMS, and was designed by Jeff Glass with support from BCCampus.

(Note: This tool is Javascript-based, and must be used on a laptop. Unfortunately, touch-based devices such as tablets or smartphones will not work.)


Keynote Address: Exploring Learning Ecologies: Models and Experiences So Far

Paul Hibbitts, SFU

Given that mobile access is now the new baseline, what is the next step for us to help better support our students in this age of networked information?

For Paul Hibbitts it starts with anytime/anywhere access, utilizes a development process where learning and technology are complementary partners, and evolves into the support and creation of learning ecologies. With a learning ecology, learners have an environment and tools to help better foster their own growth and meet their individual needs.

In this discussion-style session, Paul presented a learning + technology development model and a learning ecology framework for group discussion and feedback. He also shared a recent course where he leveraged both of these models as he undertook the creation of a learning ecology for his students.

Paul Hibbitts’ Presentation: 
http://slides.com/paulhibbitts/etug-spring-2015-plenary-keynote-exploring-learning-ecologies/embed

 


More about the ETUG 2015 Spring Workshop:

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Lisa O’Neil – “Media in Education”, May 20, 2015

On Sept 17, 2014, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Researching Conditions That Embed Media in Education; Is It Really Just a ‘Matter of Time’?” by Lisa O’Neill.

In January of 2013 a case study was launched at BCIT that sought to identify essential conditions that embed media in higher education learner experiences. This educational media study gathered learner-directed study habits, utilized findings to redesign faculty-directed activities, and uncovered the value and impact of both approaches to frame five essential conditions to embed media in teaching and learning.

The first half of the workshop briefly situates the investigation within the current media and adoption literature (by providing an overview of media ecology and situated learning) and introduces attendees to 4 characters who are supported by media enhanced learner experiences. The second half of the workshop discusses how the case study identified conditions could be implemented within VCC courses/programs.

Learning Preferences: Peter Fenrich

On Sept 17, 2014, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Learning Preferences” by Peter Fenrich.

This workshop allows you to assess your own learning preferences and then presents some research findings and practical ideas for designing lessons that effectively accommodate the varied learning preferences of students.

Peter Fenrich is an Instructional Development Consultant at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. He supports instructor and curriculum development. He also creates innovative computer-based training and simulation software. His work has won international awards. Peter’s book entitled, “Creating Instructional Multimedia Solutions: Practical Guidelines for the Real World”, provides practical information gained through years of experience. Peter also works internationally as a consultant.

Accessibility in Online Learning Environments: Betty Noble and Karon Lee

On Sept. 24, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Accessibility in Online Learning”.

VCC Instructor (and former head of the Visually Impaired Program) Betty Noble, and SFU Distance Learning Consultant Karon Lee presented their experiences with accessibility issues in developing online courses.

Some of the key topics covered in this hour-long presentation were:

  • Accessibility support in different Learning Management Systems (WebCT, Canvas, and Moodle).
  • How Universal Design for Learning (UDL) supports accessibility.
  • Compatibility issues of web browsers and the JAWS screen reader.
  • Key points to remember when striving for accessibility.

CID Activity Reports: 2012 to 2013

CID-Logo-Blue

Each year, the Centre for Instructional Development posts its annual CID Activity Report, which documents the consultation, development and support activities delivered to the VCC community.

The 2012-2013 Activity Report is now available on the CID website.
It covers a wide array of topics:

  • Program Renewal
  • Curriculum Development
  • Instructional Development
  • Distributed Learning
  • Study of Teaching and Learning
  • Policy Review Groups and Committee Work
  • IRA Support
  • Faculty Postings: Selection, Election and Area Hiring Recommendations

Learn more about the CID, its mission, and previous Activity Reports on our “About Us” page.

VCC Receives NSERC Applied Research Eligibility Status

2011_employee_excellence_awards_051_CroppedCongratulations to Dean Karen Belfer and to Vancouver Community College (VCC) for this great achievement.

Dr. Karen Belfer, VCC’s Dean of the Centre for Teaching Innovation and Applied Research & Interim Dean of the School of Arts and Science, attained eligibility for VCC.  Dr Belfer meticulously completed the rigorous application for Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) eligibility status to apply for research funding.

Dean Belfer’s education and experience in applied research and active participation on VCC’s Education Council Policy Committee and her work as chair of the VCC Research Ethics Board greatly assisted with VCC’s NSERC application.

NSERC aims to make Canada a country of discoverers and innovators for the benefit of all Canadians. The agency supports university students in their advanced studies, promotes and supports discovery research, and fosters innovation by encouraging Canadian companies to participate and invest in post secondary research projects. NSERC researchers are on the vanguard of science, building on Canada’s long tradition of scientific excellence. (Cited Sept 3rd 2013 at http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/index_eng.asp)

This status is only granted to institutions that meet NSERC’s eligibility requirements to administer funds granted by them. The eligibility sets out the general terms and conditions governing the institution’s administration of grants and awards by federal granting agencies.

NSERC eligibility status is not a guarantee of funding. Each research proposal is investigated and assessed further by the NSERC peer review committees which assess the excellence of the applicants and the merits of their proposals on an individual basis.

The eligibility agreement is a document common to three federal granting agencies including NSERC, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council    and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

VCC’s eligibility is confirmed by NSERC only. The eligibility status and the agreement between NSERC and VCC represents an important and tangible element in the accountability of granting agencies and institutions in support of research and in their responsibility for the effective management and use of the research investment made by the Federal Government of Canada.

Congratulations to Dean Karen Belfer and VCC for this great achievement!

Enhancing Post-Secondary Students’ Work Readiness for Multicultural Environments through Sociocultural Competence Training

On July 9, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Enhancing Post-Secondary Students’ Work Readiness for Multicultural Environments through Sociocultural Competence Training”, presented by Dr. Anita Mak.

In order to develop post-secondary students’ work readiness in culturally diverse societies and international environments, educators have advocated that program leaders should engage faculty members in embedding intercultural competence development in the curriculum, and evaluate the subsequent impact on faculty and student outcomes. This approach has been adopted in an Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) Project titled “Internationalisation at Home” (IaH), which involved providing Business and Health faculty with professional development adapted from an established sociocultural competency training resource – the EXCELL (Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program.

This VCC Learn@Lunch seminar reported the action research processes and outcomes of the IaH Project implemented at two Australian universities. Also, Vancouver Community College faculty and professional staff members shared their reflections on teaching innovations and first-hand experiences with embedding sociocultural competency training in the curricula of diverse disciplines.

About Dr. Anita Mak:

Dr Anita Mak is currently Visiting Professor at the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology & Special Education, Faculty of Education, UBC. She is Professor of Psychology, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Australia and a fellow of the International Academy of Intercultural Research. Anita’s specialist research areas are acculturation, sociocultural competence training, adolescent and immigrant mental health, and employment-related stress.

Anita is a co-developer of the EXCELL (Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program. EXCELL is an evidence-based behavioural program for developing sociocultural competencies that has been introduced into over 100 educational institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK,
and Europe.

Motivating Students: Peter Fenrich

On May 13, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Motivating Students”, presented by Peter Fenrich.

This session discussed the ARCS motivation model and how it can be applied to address the attributes of attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction.  Attendees were asked to reflect on their own experiences and how the model can apply to their own classes.

Peter Fenrich is an Instructional Development Consultant at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. He supports instructor and curriculum development. He also creates innovative computer-based training and simulation software. His work has won international awards.

Peter’s book entitled, “Creating Instructional Multimedia Solutions: Practical Guidelines for the Real World”, provides practical information gained through years of experience. Peter also works internationally as a consultant.

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 1 of 3

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 2 of 3

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 3 of 3

Internationalization of Curriculum: Terry Fuller

On Nov. 5, 2012, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the workshop “Internationalization of Curriculum”, presented by Terry Fuller.

Terry Fuller worked for BCIT for many years before retiring in 2010. She has lived in other countries and traveled to Europe, Southeast Asia, and Central and South America. In 2008, while at BCIT, she headed a research project on internationalization of the curriculum. BCIT has initiated several of the recommendations from her research.

In the video clips below, Terry Fuller highlights her recommendations and suggests strategies to internationalize curricula.

Terry Fuller, Internationalization – Clip 1 of 2

Terry Fuller, Internationalization – Clip 1 of 2

Online Ingredients Increase Critical Thinking and Skills Development for VCC Baking Students

By Robin Popow (Instructional Associate, Centre for Instructional Development)

In 2011 VCC’s Baking and Pastry Arts Department embarked on a curriculum redevelopment project for their Artisan Baking Certificate and Pastry Certificate programs.

It was decided early that the new curriculum would utilize affordances offered by the online environment to help increase retention, student engagement and reflective practice.

While the project was clearly a collaborative effort with department and college members, instructor and project lead, Fionna Chong sat down and shared the details of this exciting project. While the curriculum was redeveloped for these programs, the focus of our discussion was on the instructional strategies and use of educational technology. Two primary strategies were described including the use of videos and reflective journaling.

Instructional Videos

Videos illustrating critical concepts were created to offer students the ability to revisit lessons outside the classroom to better accommodate their own pace of learning. Referred to as ‘Concepts’ these videos have proven to be very useful to students and provide an excellent example of how a conservative approach can be taken to create videos that are targeted towards achieving outcomes while being practical and easy to produce.

Another series of demonstration videos target those laboratory demonstrations that either take too long to set up or are not necessarily easy for all students to see. The primary aim of these videos is to reduce the amount of time instructors spend on theory so they can increase the amount of time instructors can give supporting students in their hands-on work. This is found by many applied programs to be most beneficial for helping students hone their skills as well as constructing and connecting their knowledge.

Screen Capturing Presentations

Fionna has developed a system for creating her videos that allows her to use applications she already knows without having to become expert or spend loads of time video editing. Typically, she creates a slide show of pertinent points using Microsoft PowerPoint, then runs the slideshow and adds narration while filming using the screencast application Active Presenter.

This enables her to break out of her slideshow and run videos or draw on a blackboard application just as she would normally do in a face-to-face classroom. At the time of this interview, the Baking Departments YouTube channel boasted a series of concept and lab-demo videos with more than 5000 views. Fionna has received very positive feedback from students stating “…this is [particularly] wonderful for learners who are ESL”.

TED-Ed

TED Ed lesson

Click the image to see a sample of a lesson used by Baking students

The program is also beginning to use a new web application created by Ted.com which allows you to use engaging videos to create customized lessons. As stated on the TED-Ed beta site,You can use, tweak, or completely redo any lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on any video from YouTube.

Reflective Journaling

Historically, the Baking Department has considered reflective practice as a core instructional strategy but found that students often provided shallow statements such as “I will need to try harder next time”, or “I burned the bread again”. Fionna suggested that students “…just weren’t thinking critically enough to reflect in a meaningful way” and needed to learn how to reflect. As a result, the new curriculum requires students to contribute on a regular basis to an online journal or what they call a “Folio Hub” using the WordPress blogging platform.

Click here to visit the sample page – use “dessertwine” as the password

In addition to samples of good posts of reflective practice the hub serves as a place for teaching students how to think critically to provide meaningful contributions.  RubricBefore starting, students are required to assess a sample student journal using a Reflective Journaling Rubric.

Instructors provide feedback on students journal contributions in effort to make crucial connections that students may miss.  Fionna noted that “…it’s all about connecting the theory to their practice in the lab” and added that even though a constant struggle may always exist to get those who wish not to write to contribute regularly, students are now talking and even helping each other with the project – reaching a whole new level of engagement. Instructors have found that, “they really enjoy reading the posts!”

When asked what the department plans next, Fionna suggested that potential exists for using interactive animations and other learning objects that may already be available. Additionally, the department would like to provide some of these new strategies to their apprentice classes but for now are concentrating on getting all instructors familiar with the new curriculum.

Anyone interested in finding out more about any of the information provided in this post is encouraged to contact the Centre for Instructional Development (CID) at dlsupport@vcc.ca.