VCC 2017 Educational Technology Showcase – May 29, 2017

On May 29, 2017, Vancouver Community College was pleased to present our third Educational Technology showcase, called “The Flipped School”.

Held at the VCC Broadway campus, it gave our Faculty a way to showcase educational technologies, best practises, and to learn from the experience of their VCC colleagues.

The Showcase was located in and around Room 1228, Bldg B of the Broadway campus, and encompassed over eleven presentations over six hours. You can see this year’s event schedule at the VCC EdTech Showcase registration site and check out Twitter activity at the hashtag #vccedtech

Here’s a little video welcome (and a look at how far we’ve come!)

Here are descriptions, videos and resources from the day’s presentations:


Keynote Speaker: Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Dr. Jhangiani gave an impassioned presentation in defence of open educational resources and open textbooks, particularly commenting on the impacts of rising textbook costs on student success.


(Dr. Jhangiani’s full lecture notes are available online.)

Related Resources:

About the Presenter:

Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani is the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where he conducts research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. A recipient of the Robert E. Knox Master Teacher Award from the University of British Columbia and the Dean of Arts Teaching Excellence award at KPU, Dr. Jhangiani serves as the Senior Open Education Advocacy and Research Fellow with BCcampus, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. Dr. Jhangiani has revised two open textbooks—for Research Methods and Social Psychology—and advocates for the adoption of open educational and science practices. His books include A Compendium of Scales for Use in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2015) and Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science (2017, Ubiquity Press).


Workshop: Moodle / BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

Presenter: Robin Popow, VCC Auto Collision Program

Auto Collision Instructor Robin Popow demonstrated how he and his students maximize the power of their mobile devices to enable a truly flipped learning environment.

Robin showed how his Students use their own mobile devices to participate in on-the-fly polls using Socrative.com

…and he also showed the advantages of using Moodle and the student’s mobile devices to run on-the-spot assessments from the shop floor, and to manage attendance in real-time using Moodle’s Attendance module.

About the Presenter:

Robin Popow is a third generation Collision Repair technician and Paint technician with a Red Seal designation in both. Robin has held a variety of different roles relating to the auto industry including a small family collision repair shop, a major dealership, and two stints at ICBC.

Robin began his career at VCC in 2001, gained a teaching diploma, then a Master’s degree in Education from Simon Fraser University. He served as an Instructional Associate at VCC for 7 years followed by a position as Standards Manager with the Industry Training Authority of BC before returning to his true love – teaching trades skills at VCC. Robin’s speciality is the development and delivery of flexible learning programs and currently instructs his department’s distant learning high school program to students all over BC.


Health Sciences Simulated Learning Experience (SLE) Lab Demonstration

Faculty and Technicians from the Health Sciences Program led two group demonstrations of their high-fidelity patient simulation system. Their robotic “patients” can be programmed for a wide variety of conditions and responses, in order to provide realistic Student challenges.

The Simulated Learning Experiences (SLE) lab is designed to help learners practice skills and interventions in a simulated hospital environment. These opportunities recreate realistic scenarios that reflect the complexities of patient care. The goal is for nurses to practice patient care and to experience the positive and negative impacts of on-the-job decision-making, in a safe environment.


Workshop: Skype for Business

Presenter: Julieta Herrera, VCC IT Dept.

Julieta demonstrated how to use Skype for Business to schedule and set-up video conferences between people at VCC and/or at external institutions, and also showed how to use the presentation recording feature.

About the Presenter:

Julieta Herrera has worked with Educational Technology in the IT department at VCC for the last five years. While evaluating practices and technologies on an ongoing basis, she collaborates with faculty and students on using technology to support educational experiences. Julieta have worked in other universities in Mexico and Canada and she holds degrees from a university in Mexico. She enjoys working with the faculty at VCC to better understand the Educational Technologies that will assist them in their teaching.


Panel Discussion: Culinary Arts Curriculum Project

This panel discussion reviewed a large curriculum redevelopment project undertaken by the VCC Culinary Arts program. The panel will discuss the new Culinary programs and the lessons learned from the development of a blended delivery model using Moodle.

 

View the slides from the Culinary Arts project panel

Panel Presenters:

  • VCC’s VP of Academic and Research, Dr. Kathryn McNaughton
  • Shirley Lew, VCC Dean of Library and Teaching & Learning Services
  • Ysabel Sukic, Asst. Department Head, Culinary Arts
  • Garth Manning, Instructional Associate, Centre for Instructional Development
  • John Love, Moodle Media Developer, Centre for Instructional Development

Lightning Talk Presentations

Inspired by the rapid-fire format of Pecha Kucha, presenters were given a chance to describe their topic in about three minutes.


Workshop: ePortfolios at VCC

Presenter: Andy Sellwood, Centre for Instructional Development

This presentation takes a look at what ePortfolios are and how they can be used in different educational programs. The Exabis ePortfolio system is being piloted at VCC, and was briefly demonstrated to show one possibility of implementing ePortfolios into programs.

View the slideshow from the ePortfolios session

About the Presenter:

Andy Sellwood is an Instructional Associate in the Centre for Instructional Development (CID) at VCC. Prior to joining CID, Andy was a physics instructor as well as being the department head of Science at VCC between 2010 and 2015. Andy’s interests lie in student motivation, program design and program implementation.


Lisa O’Neil – “Media in Education”, May 20, 2015

On Sept 17, 2014, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Researching Conditions That Embed Media in Education; Is It Really Just a ‘Matter of Time’?” by Lisa O’Neill.

In January of 2013 a case study was launched at BCIT that sought to identify essential conditions that embed media in higher education learner experiences. This educational media study gathered learner-directed study habits, utilized findings to redesign faculty-directed activities, and uncovered the value and impact of both approaches to frame five essential conditions to embed media in teaching and learning.

The first half of the workshop briefly situates the investigation within the current media and adoption literature (by providing an overview of media ecology and situated learning) and introduces attendees to 4 characters who are supported by media enhanced learner experiences. The second half of the workshop discusses how the case study identified conditions could be implemented within VCC courses/programs.

Learning Preferences: Peter Fenrich

On Sept 17, 2014, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Learning Preferences” by Peter Fenrich.

This workshop allows you to assess your own learning preferences and then presents some research findings and practical ideas for designing lessons that effectively accommodate the varied learning preferences of students.

Peter Fenrich is an Instructional Development Consultant at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. He supports instructor and curriculum development. He also creates innovative computer-based training and simulation software. His work has won international awards. Peter’s book entitled, “Creating Instructional Multimedia Solutions: Practical Guidelines for the Real World”, provides practical information gained through years of experience. Peter also works internationally as a consultant.

Accessibility in Online Learning Environments: Betty Noble and Karon Lee

On Sept. 24, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Accessibility in Online Learning”.

VCC Instructor (and former head of the Visually Impaired Program) Betty Noble, and SFU Distance Learning Consultant Karon Lee presented their experiences with accessibility issues in developing online courses.

Some of the key topics covered in this hour-long presentation were:

  • Accessibility support in different Learning Management Systems (WebCT, Canvas, and Moodle).
  • How Universal Design for Learning (UDL) supports accessibility.
  • Compatibility issues of web browsers and the JAWS screen reader.
  • Key points to remember when striving for accessibility.

CID Activity Reports: 2012 to 2013

CID-Logo-Blue

Each year, the Centre for Instructional Development posts its annual CID Activity Report, which documents the consultation, development and support activities delivered to the VCC community.

The 2012-2013 Activity Report is now available on the CID website.
It covers a wide array of topics:

  • Program Renewal
  • Curriculum Development
  • Instructional Development
  • Distributed Learning
  • Study of Teaching and Learning
  • Policy Review Groups and Committee Work
  • IRA Support
  • Faculty Postings: Selection, Election and Area Hiring Recommendations

Learn more about the CID, its mission, and previous Activity Reports on our “About Us” page.

VCC Receives NSERC Applied Research Eligibility Status

2011_employee_excellence_awards_051_CroppedCongratulations to Dean Karen Belfer and to Vancouver Community College (VCC) for this great achievement.

Dr. Karen Belfer, VCC’s Dean of the Centre for Teaching Innovation and Applied Research & Interim Dean of the School of Arts and Science, attained eligibility for VCC.  Dr Belfer meticulously completed the rigorous application for Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) eligibility status to apply for research funding.

Dean Belfer’s education and experience in applied research and active participation on VCC’s Education Council Policy Committee and her work as chair of the VCC Research Ethics Board greatly assisted with VCC’s NSERC application.

NSERC aims to make Canada a country of discoverers and innovators for the benefit of all Canadians. The agency supports university students in their advanced studies, promotes and supports discovery research, and fosters innovation by encouraging Canadian companies to participate and invest in post secondary research projects. NSERC researchers are on the vanguard of science, building on Canada’s long tradition of scientific excellence. (Cited Sept 3rd 2013 at http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/index_eng.asp)

This status is only granted to institutions that meet NSERC’s eligibility requirements to administer funds granted by them. The eligibility sets out the general terms and conditions governing the institution’s administration of grants and awards by federal granting agencies.

NSERC eligibility status is not a guarantee of funding. Each research proposal is investigated and assessed further by the NSERC peer review committees which assess the excellence of the applicants and the merits of their proposals on an individual basis.

The eligibility agreement is a document common to three federal granting agencies including NSERC, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council    and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

VCC’s eligibility is confirmed by NSERC only. The eligibility status and the agreement between NSERC and VCC represents an important and tangible element in the accountability of granting agencies and institutions in support of research and in their responsibility for the effective management and use of the research investment made by the Federal Government of Canada.

Congratulations to Dean Karen Belfer and VCC for this great achievement!

Enhancing Post-Secondary Students’ Work Readiness for Multicultural Environments through Sociocultural Competence Training

On July 9, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Enhancing Post-Secondary Students’ Work Readiness for Multicultural Environments through Sociocultural Competence Training”, presented by Dr. Anita Mak.

In order to develop post-secondary students’ work readiness in culturally diverse societies and international environments, educators have advocated that program leaders should engage faculty members in embedding intercultural competence development in the curriculum, and evaluate the subsequent impact on faculty and student outcomes. This approach has been adopted in an Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) Project titled “Internationalisation at Home” (IaH), which involved providing Business and Health faculty with professional development adapted from an established sociocultural competency training resource – the EXCELL (Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program.

This VCC Learn@Lunch seminar reported the action research processes and outcomes of the IaH Project implemented at two Australian universities. Also, Vancouver Community College faculty and professional staff members shared their reflections on teaching innovations and first-hand experiences with embedding sociocultural competency training in the curricula of diverse disciplines.

About Dr. Anita Mak:

Dr Anita Mak is currently Visiting Professor at the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology & Special Education, Faculty of Education, UBC. She is Professor of Psychology, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Australia and a fellow of the International Academy of Intercultural Research. Anita’s specialist research areas are acculturation, sociocultural competence training, adolescent and immigrant mental health, and employment-related stress.

Anita is a co-developer of the EXCELL (Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program. EXCELL is an evidence-based behavioural program for developing sociocultural competencies that has been introduced into over 100 educational institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK,
and Europe.

Motivating Students: Peter Fenrich

On May 13, 2013, the Centre for Instructional Development proudly presented the Learn @ Lunch Workshop “Motivating Students”, presented by Peter Fenrich.

This session discussed the ARCS motivation model and how it can be applied to address the attributes of attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction.  Attendees were asked to reflect on their own experiences and how the model can apply to their own classes.

Peter Fenrich is an Instructional Development Consultant at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. He supports instructor and curriculum development. He also creates innovative computer-based training and simulation software. His work has won international awards.

Peter’s book entitled, “Creating Instructional Multimedia Solutions: Practical Guidelines for the Real World”, provides practical information gained through years of experience. Peter also works internationally as a consultant.

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 1 of 3

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 2 of 3

Peter Fenrich, Motivating Students, May13/13 – Clip 3 of 3

“Blow up the Learning Management System!”

By Robin Popow (Instructional Associate, Centre for Instructional Development)

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David Porter, BCcampus Executive Director

This though-provoking statement made by BCcampus Director, David Porter sparked an interesting debate at the 2013 Canada MoodleMoot in Vancouver.

Porter made the statement during a panel discussion suggesting that educators have more freedom using the rapidly growing community of cloud based applications versus affordances offered by the learning management system (LMS). In a followup interview Porter added,

“The LMS is about the “management” of learning, something I oppose in higher education. Don’t mind scaffolding, but dislike management. LMS are managed for instructors and students. I want instructors and students co-manage the learning environment. It’s a new literacy for instructors. It needs to be under their control. Most LMS are just labour-intensive, confining electro-gradebook environments. Instructors need to wean themselves from the electro-pablum of the LMS.”

As you might expect, Moodle founder Martin Dougiamas disagreed with this and presented a good case in support of the LMS but I thought I’d offer my opinion from a Vancouver Community College perspective – I think they’re both right!

I loved Porters analogy of the LMS (Moodle in our case) as a “Swiss army knife” of educational technology. In a very practical way, Moodle does offer a tool to accommodate every popular e-learning strategy to some degree as well as enabling consistent standards of development, delivery and e-learning process College-wide. Porter was keen to follow up on this as well adding,knife

“Swiss Army Knife (SWK): A SWK is a general purpose tool that confines its users to a limited range of very general activities. I’d rather pick the tactical blade to do the job I need. Cloud-based apps give us a whole range of choices for more targeted application and open-ended learning experiences. An LMS is an artificial learning environment, and Moodle represents Martin’s particular worldview, that I do not accept as an autonomous professional.”

To some extent I agree that some Moodle tools tend to provide only rudimentary solutions but I do feel that it generally provides a great platform from which to begin. By that I mean, both from the perspective of an instructor just beginning to use e-learning strategies as well as an instructor who establishes Moodle as a base and sends students off to cloud-based apps that provide more flexibility, advanced features, etc than those in Moodle (Porter’s point I believe). For example and as the later suggests, an activity that focuses on student collaboration to develop a webpage or document would likely be better served using an app dedicated to the purpose of being a wiki such as MediaWiki. Likewise, an activity focused on student folios may be better served using an app such as WordPress.

moodle-platformDuring the MoodleMoot I had a chance to further discuss this with Dougiamas who agreed that the “walls” that once boxed us into Moodle have been effectively removed with the additions of external repositories such as YouTube, MediWiki, Google Docs, etc.

So, I guess my point is that the LMS provides a practical, cost effective and convenient way to manage e-learning. That said, Porter really has a point and we should always encourage those innovators to venture into the clouds. Their explorations blaze new (safe) trails for all of us.

Moodle Moot Canada 2013: Day 3

MoodleMoot2013From February 13-15, 2013, members of the Centre for Instructional Development (CID) attended the  Moodle Moot Canada 2013 conference in Vancouver.

The CID and the DL Support team attended a variety of educational and technical sessions at this stimulating two and a half day conference. (Many attendees tweeted out URLs, notes and quotes using the hashtag #mootca13.)

Session: Moodle Development Best Practices – Justin Filip

Justin Filip is the Manager of Software Development for Remote Learner Canada (http://www.remote-learner.ca), an official Moodle Partner. Remote Learner builds custom solutions for Moodle clients, and in particular, integrates Moodle with other systems or products.

In this session, Justin covered:

  • Overview of Moodle plugin systems and available APIs
  • Working with the Moodle Tracker; Peer review process
  • Maintaining a custom plugin using GitHub
    (Templates for Activity modules are available there.)
  • Submitting core patches and bug fixes to Moodle HQ
  • Accessing Moodle Developer Docs at moodledocs.org
  • Discussed using Selenium to do automated browser testing

http://www.slideshare.net/justinfilip/moodle-development-best-pracitces

Plenary: The Business of Social Learning – Bradley Shende

Bradley Shende is the Founder and CEO of M2O Digital Agency, as well as Global TV’s resident Technology Commentator. At Moodle Moot Canada 2013, he spread his passion for technology’s influence on our daily lives. In addition to inspiring international audiences as a keynote speaker, his infectious content stimulates his audiences to embrace a future where technology is understood, accessible and fun.

He touched on our multicultural society and the related diversity in information and education by relating them to his own diversity: His Father was from Trinidad, and studied Medicine in Winnipeg. His Mother, a native Winnipegger,  spotted him at a social event, and the rest is history. Bradley feels that his parents were early adopters of globalism the importance of shared connections.

Bradley’s number one technology tip:  “Just click things.” Don’t be afraid to click things and play with gadgets.

His analogy for crowd-sourcing in Twitter: “It’s  like having a group of people together in one room. Write a question on piece of paper and pass it around. When the paper came back, you’ll have some great answers to your initial question.”

Bradley proceeded to rouse his crowd to action, getting everyone on their feet to take part in a meme from YouTube:

Moodle Moot Canada 2013 Does “The Harlem Shake”:

What has changed for our generation, or our children’s generation? Touchscreens have radically changed our expectations of what media can do and how we expect to access it. Bradley told a story of how when surfing the Sesame Street website on his laptop, how his 2-yr-old son (who was more familiar with using his Dad’s iPad) wondered why Elmo was “broken” because there was no touch-screen response on the laptop’s screen.

We (as a culture) have changed the input method – no longer strictly text-based papers or essays – and we’ve changed the way information is sourced. Wikipedia has grown larger in a few years than Encyclopedia Britannica did over hundreds of years.

The “Shift has Happened” video:

This video challenges us all to imagine the future. and as educators ask ourselves the question “Am I preparing students for jobs that do not yet exist, or for jobs that will no longer exist by the time they’re trained?”

Other Observations from Bradley Shende:

  • Increasing user-generated content leads to increased-self publishing and self-curation.
  • “Gamification”: Kids are bored, and often seek novelty. It’s important to challenge yourself, think creatively, and to network.
  • Social Media can transform students from individual silos of knowledge into connected nodes.

Bradley closed with some inspiring suggestions:

Reconnect the soul of education to the world.
See through the eyes of a child. That’s knowledge.
We all need to become Learners, together.