Technology Trends and the Courage to Adapt: CID Learn@Lunch with Tony Bates & Gary Poole

Higher Education Institutions are paradoxical places when it comes to change. On the one hand, they have long-standing traditions dating back centuries. On the other, they are expected to be drivers of innovation, new practices and new thinking. Nowhere is this paradox more clearly demonstrated than in our teaching, where time-honoured practice meet rapid change. This change may be brought on by economic realities, shifts in student characteristics,research on pedagogy, or the introduction of new technologies. Whatever the reason, change can be difficult for those of us who teach in higher education in an era of greater demands to teach effectively.

The technology isn’t letting up. As well as new technologies outside the LMS, such as blogs, wikis, e-portfolios, mobile learning, now LMSes are undergoing some radical changes. What does this mean for the faculty member? In this session, we look at a few of the more significant developments, in particular how some instructors have incorporated some of these technologies, and suggest some simple steps or strategies for instructors to be innovative without getting overwhelmed by the changes in technology.

Put simply, change takes courage — to step outside our comfort zones, to risk the uncertain, and to embrace the unfamiliar with our students. In this April 24, 2012 session, Dr. Bates and Dr. Poole delivered an inspiring and insightful look at how educators and institutions can approach change in constructive and thoughtful ways.

Feel free to download the presentations and recorded videos of this session:

The CID would like to thank Dr. Poole and Dr. Bates, as well as Leva Lee at BCcampus, Jason Toal at SFU, and Grant Potter at UNBC for their support of this event.

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